State offices and all DLLR physical locations will be closed to the public December 24 & December 25, 2014. However, Unemployment Insurance telephone and Web operations WILL be available on Wednesday, December 24.

American Job Centers

 

Skills Identification - Brochures - Job Search - One-Stop Career Centers

 

Download this brochure (Word document, 27KB, download Word viewer for free)

 

Skills are the performance specifications of your product-- you

An important part of marketing your skills to employers is taking stock of what you have to offer so that you don’t undervalue yourself. Skills come from many different sources. Not all skills are gained by way of paid employment. You may have also gained significant skills as a volunteer where you were not paid. These skills still have value and could be in demand. As you analyze your skills, do not just think about the job titles you have held. Think about the specifics you did on each job. Consider the skills you possess, the skills you do not possess, and the skills you want to develop or refine. Compare your skills with the skills required in the jobs that interest you. This will enable you to understand how well you qualify for a position. Also, you will know what additional training or experience you need.

You probably don’t realize how many skills you have. In fact, you probably have more than you think. Employers want to know what skills you will bring to the job. You must be able to identify and give examples of your skills. Of all job seekers, 80-85% cannot describe their job skills in an interview. Knowing what you can do is an important part of your job search and your life.

There are three areas of skills to consider:

Self-Management

These are the skills you use day-to-day to get along with others to survive. They are the skills that make you unique. Sincerity, reliability, tactfulness, patience, flexibility, timeliness, and tolerance are all examples of self-management skills. Motivational attributes and attitudes are also self-management skills. Persistence, drive and cooperation are more examples. Do not underestimate self-management skills, especially those that show motivation and a good work attitude. Employers look for these skills to determine how a candidate will fit into the organization. How a person will "fit in" is an important consideration for employers.

Transferable

Transferable skills are the tools that enable you to move seamlessly from industry to industry, from career to career. Transferable skills can clearly illustrate to a prospective employer that:

  1. You’ve done this before and you can do it again
  2. You’ve done something similar and you can adapt

Simply put, they are skills you possess that can be used in an array of work situations. The skill sets required will vary considerably from industry to industry, and by work responsibilities. They can be derived from a variety of sources: your accomplishments, both personal and professional; your diverse work experiences; at-work training and educational background.

Having many transferable skills is sort of like being in a large, multi-model car dealer’s parts department. The parts department may have thousands of parts, but if you, the customer, (or employer) needs a part for your Chevy, then you need that specific part. It doesn’t make a bit of difference if the car dealer has the world’s largest inventory of Honda parts – you want Chevy parts.

Job-Related

Job-related skills are those skills specific to a job or occupation. A secretary is skilled in typing, word processing, answering telephones, company correspondence, and filing. An accountant would list accounts receivable, performing accounts payable, payroll, figuring taxes, using a 10-key adding machine, and computer accounting programs. A salesperson would include customer service, record keeping, order processing, inventory management, billing, and product displays. Job-related skills are important to employers for obvious reasons. They are the specific skills employers look for in a candidate.

As you create your own unique inventory of skills:

  • Don’t get hung up over definitions or the process of how you identify your skills. The goal is to generate a list of skills. Definitions and process are simply tools to help you achieve that goal.
  • Don’t limit yourself. Give yourself the benefit of the doubt.
  • You do not have to be an expert to claim a skill. Include skills you may be just learning.

. . . most of what we know and what we’ve become
we’ve learned from others . . .
we are all students . . .

DESCRIBE YOUR SKILLS USING CONCRETE EXAMPLES

  1. State the SKILL or STRENGTH
     
  2. Give SPECIFICS (when, where, what and how)
     
  3. Show beneficial RESULTS
     
  4. LINK TO THE NEW JOB

Use the following format:

  1. SKILL or STRENGTH
  2. "I am extremely reliable."

  3. SPECIFICS (when, where, what and how)
  4. "Last summer my boss at Allied Distributing was in the hospital and I was responsible for taking care of our customers for two months. I was the first to arrive and the last to leave. I double-checked every order and I made follow-up calls to each customer on a weekly basis."

  5. RESULTS
  6. "During that time, our customers never experienced any delays or were inconvenienced and my supervisor was reassured because she could count on me to take the initiative and get the job done."

  7. LINK TO THE NEW JOB
  8. "I believe my proven reliability would really enhance your company’s fine reputation for excellent customer service."

DESCRIBE YOUR SKILLS USING CONCRETE EXAMPLES

WHAT CAN I OFFER AN EMPLOYER?

  • SKILLS

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • SPECIFICS

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • RESULTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • LINK TO NEW JOB

 

 

 

 

Return to the top of the page