text only version
By Design
Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation
Summer 2006
An Electronic Newsletter by the Maryland State Boards of:
Architects, Certified Interior Designers, Examiners of Landscape Architects
Professional Engineers, Professional Land Surveyors
COMMISSIONER'S MESSAGE
Joseph Sliwka
Commissioner, Occupational & Professional Licensing
IN THIS ISSUE:

Commissioner's Message

ARCHITECTURE:

Earn C.E. Units With NCARB's Newest Monograph, Senior Living

NCARB Establishes Grant Program to Encourage Integration of Practice in the Academy

ENGINEERING:

Northeast Zone Meeting Convened

INTERIOR DESIGN:

Building Safety for Interior Designers, Too

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE:

April 2006 Recognized as National Landscape Architecture Month

LAND SURVEYING:

Mechanics Lien Law Signed

Exceptional Proctors Make for Efficient Exam Administration

Brochure Creation Underway

By Design Archive Operational

Contacts

Printer Friendly Version
 


Joe Sliwka, Commissioner, Occupational and Professional Licensing
When I was appointed Acting Commissioner late in 2005, I was immediately engulfed into the legislative session of 2006.  With the 2006 legislative session consuming most of my time, I was glad to see the session end in April so that I could attend all of the Design Boards’ meetings.  I will look forward to meeting and working with the boards’ chairpersons as well as members throughout the rest of the year.

With over 23,000 licensees, I want to especially thank all the board members who represent the licensees. I also want to thank them for the generous time they donate in serving not only the licensees, but all citizens of Maryland.  Serving on the board is clearly a distinct honor and shows a position of leadership.  The expertise and knowledge of these board members affect the whole industry as they help set regulations, adopt mandatory standards of professional conduct, and help propose new legislation as well as hear complaints and investigate them.

I would also like to welcome aboard Janine McDonald, our new editor for the “By Design” newsletter.  Janine is a graduate of Howard University, Washington, D.C., with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and News-Editorial Journalism.  After working for the court system she has decided to return to her first love—journalism.  Most recently, she worked for BOSS Staffing as an editor and desktop publisher before obtaining her current position with the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation as an administrative officer/communications specialist for the five Professional Design Boards.

Notably, Ms. McDonald worked as a civil and criminal docket court reporter and transcriptionist at the Howard County Circuit Court for the Fifth Judicial Circuit.  Ms. McDonald has also worked as a freelance writer and editor, most recently serving as the editor for the Habitat News, a publication of Habitat for Humanity.  In addition, she has volunteered in assisting with church publications and in helping individuals to improve their writing.

Please join me in welcoming Janine into our family.  If anyone has anything of interest for the Design Boards, please contact Janine at jmcdonald@dllr.state.md.us or 410-230-6215.

To review the qualifications for board service visit the design board’s homepage:   http://www.dllr.state.md.us/license/design/ and click on a board and the Online Law & Regulations button to see the specific requirements for Appointment to the Board.
Home
ARCHITECTURE
artistic page break
EARN C.E. UNITS WITH NCARB’S NEWEST
MONOGRAPH, SENIOR LIVING

The over-65 age group makes up the fastest-growing segment of the population, which is expected to reach 80 million by 2030. Senior Living, the newest monograph by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, shares insights on special housing to meet the unique needs and preferences of seniors. It is one of 18 titles currently offered in a series of monographs for continuing education.

Pre-1980s, seniors’ options were “often limited to an unattractive mix of highly institutional nursing homes, personal care homes of inconsistent quality and a handful of retirement communities.  Today, recent efforts to remedy this state of affairs have yielded some good results…” writes Editor Stephen A. Kliment.  This thorough effort covers the different aspects of planning and design—as well as admonitions and lessons to be learned from a variety of completed projects.

Senior Living is organized around 20 most commonly asked questions in the early phases of design of this special building type. Kliment explains, “… Senior Living is not a coffee-table book lavish with color photography but meager in useable content. Instead, [it] contains hands-on information that architects, their clients and consultants require in their work, especially in the crucial early phases of the project.”

Architects who successfully complete two, 10-unit quizzes may use Senior Living to earn 20 professional development units and/or American Institute of Architects learning units in health, safety and welfare. Its price includes the monograph, two different web-based quizzes, and the score reporting process. Online, fax and mail orders are accepted for Senior Living.

For ordering information, visit the NCARB Monograph Section.

NCARB ESTABLISHES GRANT PROGRAM TO ENCOURAGE INTEGRATION OF PRACTICE IN THE ACADEMY

The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards is expanding the reach of its successful and well-received NCARB Prize initiative by establishing the NCARB Grant program, which is expected to award up to $10,000 per academic year.

The NCARB Prize for the Creative Integration of Practice and Education in the Academy debuted in 2001 as a response to Building Community: A New Future for Architecture Education, a report drafted by Lee Mitgang and the late Ernest Boyer for the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Education. The NCARB Prize encourages, rewards and showcases diverse programs and activities that integrate practice and education in an academic setting.

Now in its fifth year, the NCARB Prize has awarded more than $310,000 to NAAB-accredited schools of architecture. Since the inaugural 2001 competition, NCARB has received 175 submissions representing 78 of the 115 accredited programs in architecture. The new NCARB Prize Grants build on the momentum of the original Prize initiative.

As a separate funding venture, NCARB Grants will assist in the creation and implementation of new ideas and methods of integrating practice and education. The objective is to support and encourage concepts that may be more risk-taking than a school can initially afford on its own. Ideally, an NCARB Grant will help to develop a project that has not been implemented but which the grant will make possible.

Schools receiving NCARB Grants are encouraged to:

  • Explore different venues or innovative curricular methods/programs to increase the practice/education link or
  • Support efforts that, for a variety of reasons, have not materialized into for-credit curricular activities and therefore, have not been submitted to the NCARB Prize program. 

Under current guidelines, an NCARB Grant may not be used for university indirect costs or overhead, salary for adjuncts to teach proposed class or expenses for existing courses. NCARB does not place additional restrictions other than to suggest that the grants are to be used for work that results in interaction between students and practitioners. Grants are not intended for individual faculty enhancement activities. Budget items may include, but are not limited to, items such as:

  • Faculty release time to create the program (the studio/class will need to be part of their teaching load when initiated).
  • Cost of new technology providing long-distance interconnectivity with architectural or other appropriate offices
  • Cost of materials
  • Travel costs for students 

Each academic year, the council anticipates awarding a total of $10,000 through one, two or three grants to a NAAB-accredited school(s) to support the creation of a new curricular initiative(s) at the institution(s). NCARB reserves the right not to make any awards, based on the quality of proposals received. Members of the Council’s Practice Education Committee will review all proposals, which will comprise an application form, a narrative no longer than five pages, a supporting letter of commitment, an itemized budget, and a letter from the dean authorizing the project. Written notification of the committee’s decisions will be mailed at the beginning of December so that project(s) can start in January with the implementation of the studio/class being offered in the fall, at the latest. The selected institution(s) will receive a check and an award letter that outlines specific terms and conditions for the grant including a project report after the project is completed that will be published in NCARB reports.

For more information about the NCARB Prize Grant program, visit the NCARB Prize section of their website for a downloadable application and detailed instructions. NCARB Prize Grant submissions for the 2006-2007 academic year are due in the NCARB offices on or before 5:00 PM EST , Wednesday, November 1, 2006 .
ENGINEERING
artistic page break
NORTHEAST ZONE MEETING CONVENED
by Pastor Farinas, Board for Professional Engineers

Dr. Jeffrey Russell, PE, Chair, Committee on Academic Prerequisites for Professional Practice

The 2006 Northeast Zone Meeting of the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) was held in Charleston, W.Va., May 18-20, 2006.

The opening session started promptly at 8:30 a.m. Friday, May 19.  Northeast Zone Vice President and Meeting Moderator Larry Smith, PE, presided over all the sessions.  After the initial Invocation, Pledge of Allegiance, Roll Call of Member Boards, welcome statements and miscellaneous other items, the meeting proceeded with the different task force reports.

Among the most important reports given were the following:

  • The Examination Audit Committee reported that overall, the examinations given by the NCEES went very well and that everyone should be very proud of the exam quality.
  • The Continued Professional Competency Committee reported on the number of jurisdictions requiring CPC credits (Model Rules 240.30).  They recommended NCEES proceed with keeping track of the number of CPCs required by the different states and suggested 15 PDHs.
  • Ms. Eva-Angelina Adan, director of NCEES Center for Professional Engineering Education Services, gave a report on the evaluation services that NCEES will be providing on foreign graduates to the state boards.  They will provide a high-quality credentials evaluation of foreign graduates at a competitive price.  This service will be in competition with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.
Dr. Jeffrey Russell, PE, Chair, Committee on Academic Prerequisites for Professional Practice, discussed academic requirements for civil engineers
  • Dr. Jeffrey Russell, PE, chair of the Committee on Academic Prerequisites for Professional Practice, reported on the additional educational requirements recommended for Civil Engineers.  He gave a detailed explanation on ASCE Policy Statement 465: Academic Prerequisites for Licensure & Professional Practice and how the body of knowledge should be fulfilled by obtaining a Bachelor’s degree plus either a Master’s degree of approximately 30 acceptable credits and experience.
  • A brief report was given by each of the NCEES Committee and Task Force representatives.  Our own Skip Harclerode gave a very interesting report for the Committee on Uniform Procedures and Legislative Guidelines.

Martin Pederson, LS NCEES president, reported on the list of calculators being considered for use in the examinations.  No more than four calculators will be permitted.

Lou Ramondi, PE, LS president-elect, reported that more emphasis will be put on letting college students know about professionalism and PE registration.  He also reported on the home state CEUs and the fact that they should be usable in other states.  He will continue working on new licensure programs.

Betsy Brown, executive director, reported on the results of the collusion analysis and the fact that 40 pairs of similar exams were identified.  Finally, on the issue of what individual identification NCEES will accept from exam applicants, Ms. Brown informed our Maryland delegation that Social Security, Tax ID number, Passport identification number and Canadian Social Insurance numbers will be accepted.

The next five yearly Northeast Zone Meetings of the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying will be held in the following states:

2007—Rhode Island

2008—Massachusetts

2009—Virginia

2010—New Hampshire

2011—New York

INTERIOR DESIGN
BUILDING SAFETY FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS, TOO
by Janine S. McDonald

Building safety is a task frequently associated with the work of architects and engineers.  However, interior designers can and should pay attention to not only aesthetics but safety issues when designing. This is the conclusion presented in the recent article Design for Safety: Interior Designers Can Help Prepare for Disasters published in the Spring 2006 ASID ICON, the magazine of the American Society of Interior Designers.

The article advises interior designers to take safety into account when laying out interior spaces.  Interior designers should adhere to safety codes in anticipation of fire, flooding, earthquakes or even terrorist attacks.  Safety-oriented design can apply to interiors of a variety of structures including office buildings, hotels, nursing homes and schools.

The U.S. Department of Labor maintains the importance of interior designers being knowledgeable about safety.  In its job description for interior designers, it mentions the importance of having this skill.  Interior designers also increasingly need to know the basics of architecture and engineering in order to ensure that their designs meet building safety codes.*

It then becomes the responsibility of interior designers to find out the appropriate codes for their particular jurisdiction or state and design with those codes in mind.  Benefits could range from preventing wall hangings from falling on the elderly in the event of an earthquake to improved security for public and private schools by the implementation of special cameras.

*Bureau of Labor Statistics , U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition

Codes Resources on the Web

Below is a list of available codes resources on the Web.  Interior designers must be knowledgeable about building codes and adhere to national, state and local building codes and standards in the spaces they design.

ADA Home page—www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm

Operated by the U.S. Department of Justice, this site contains ADA regulations, information on certification, technical assistance and more.

AntiFlood—www.antiflood.com

This comprehensive site provides visitors with an understanding of where water will find its way in and how to protect against it.

ASID—www.asid.org/legislation/building+codes.htm

This section of the ASID Web site includes information on the International Codes, including state adoption, useful codes contacts, announcements of new publications and upcoming events, and other relevant codes that affect interior design.

Building Codes for Interiorswww.buildingcodesforinteriors.com

The official site for the ASID publication and its author, Kimberly Marks, ASID, IIDA, provides information about how to purchase a book, contact the author for more information or register for one of Marks’ conferences.

ER One—www.er1.org

Developed primarily for use by qualified physicians and other medical professionals, this site provides educational information and resources in the field of designs for emergency preparedness and bioterrorism.

Escape Rescue System—www.escaperescue.com

This site discusses and demonstrates an innovative system that revolutionizes the evacuation of tenants from high-rise buildings, and enables the fast and safe transportation of fire and rescue forces to the focus of an emergency.

Federal Emergency Management Agency—www.fema.gov

The official site of FEMA, a division of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

First Source—www.firstsourceonl.com/codes/index.asp

This site contains a codes database, searchable by city, county or state, as well as a list of FAQs.

InformeDesign—www.informedesign.umn.edu

The first searchable database of design and human behavior research on the Web, this site contains more than 1,100 “practitioner-friendly” Research Summaries of findings transformed from more than 145 scholarly journals related to design and human behavior.  This free, interactive site contains a variety of services for visitors, including registration to receive automated e-mail notifications about Research Summaries pertaining to specific areas of interest or practice, a monthly e-newsletter, and a tool to catalogue and store Research Summaries of interest in a personal cache, available anywhere the user has access to the Internet.

International Code Council (ICC)—www.iccsafe.org

The ICC was established in 1994 as a non-profit organization dedicated to developing a single set of comprehensive and coordinated national codes.  ICC’s Web site contains news and information about developments related to the International Codes.  Currently, 46 states have adopted the International Building Code and International Residential Code.

National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities—www.edfacilities.org

Created in 1997 by the U.S. Department of Education, the NCEF is a free public service that provides information on planning, designing, funding, building, improving, and maintaining schools.  The site includes the NCEF Safe School Facilities Checklist, which is available online at no charge and without restrictions on its use.

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)—www.nfpa.org

Established in 1896, NFPA serves as the world’s leading advocate of fire prevention and is an authoritative source on public safety.  NFPA’s 300 codes and standards influence every building, process, service, design and installation in the United States, as well as many of those used in other countries.  NFPA’s Web site includes fact sheets on fire and safety issues, as well as reports and information on fires of high technical or educational interest.

Visionglow Global Limited—www.visionglow.com.au

This Australian company offers low-cost, effective photoluminous (glow-in-the-dark) technology and products for integration into paint, plastics, resins, glass, silicones, etc., primarily for hazard identification, safety and evacuation systems that will remain illuminated long after main and auxiliary power sources are disabled.

Courtesy of the American Society of Interior Designers, ASID ICON


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
artistic page break
APRIL 2006 RECOGNIZED AS NATIONAL LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE MONTH

Courtesy of Washington Department of Transportation.

April 2006 was observed National Landscape Architecture Month by the American Society of Landscape Architects. ASLA chapters across the country celebrated with public outreach activities to help communities “Discover Landscape Architecture,” the theme for this year.  The month encompassed the 36th year of Earth Day, April 22, and the birthday of Frederick Law Olmstead, founder of the American landscape architecture profession, April 27.

Each week of the month focused on a different aspect of the profession.  The landscape architect’s roles in security design and disaster preparedness were explored April 1-8.  Renowned landscape architect Laurie Olin, who redesigned the Washington Monument grounds, gave tours of the project in conjunction with the National Building Museum.  In week two, ASLA concentrated on promoting the profession to students.  Highlights of week three included green building and sustainable design, with the week culminating with the dedication of ASLA’s landmark green roof on its Washington, DC headquarters.  During the final week of April, the focus was on residential landscape architecture, culminating with a lecture from Steven Martino, FASLA at the National Building Museum.

Courtesy of Washington Department of Transportation.

“Landscape architecture touches our lives every day in hundreds of different ways,” says Dennis Carmichael, FASLA, president of ASLA.  “National Landscape Architecture Month is a great opportunity for Americans of all ages to learn more about how landscape architecture can improve our communities, increase property values, and protect our environment through creative, sustainable design.”

LAND SURVEYING
artistic page break
MECHANICS LIEN LAW SIGNED

Maryland Governor Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr., signed HB-1060, the Mechanics Lien Law, which becomes effective October 1, 2006.  Sponsored by Delegate Christopher B. Shank, the law establishes that work done for or about a building, for purposes of establishing a mechanic's lien, includes building or landscape architectural, engineering or land surveying services.

A seminar at the upcoming Fall Conference of the Maryland Society of Surveyors October 13-14 in Ocean City will feature Jim Demma, Esq. explaining how land surveyors can use this law and other tools to collect fees for services.

EXAM DATA

ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING EXAMS - SPRING 2006

Board staff administered the Engineers and Land Surveyors Examinations April 20-22, 2006 at the Timonium Fairgrounds and the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis.

Following is a list of the number of candidates who sat for each exam.

TITLE OF EXAM

NUMBER PRESENT

NUMBER SCHEDULED

FUND. OF ENGINEERING

Timonium-306

USNA-165

348

200

P & P OF ENGINEERING

205

226

FUND. OF SURVEYING

8

8

P & P OF SURVEYING

13

13

MD LAW & ETHICS

23

23

STORM DRAIN & ROAD GRADE DESIGN

19

19


ARCHITECTURAL REGISTRATION EXAM - FIRST QUARTER 2006

Listed below are the statistics for candidates who took sections of the A.R.E. in the first quarter of 2006.

                                MARYLAND                                             NATIONAL

SECTION

# CAND.

# PASS

% PASS

# CAND.

# PASS

% PASS

Bldg. Plan.

17

12

71

1259

853

68

Bldg. Tech.

20

11

55

1229

834

68

Const. Docs.

20

18

90

1152

896

78

Gen. Struct.

18

16

89

985

762

77

Lat. Forces

14

8

57

842

627

74

Mat. & Meth.

20

18

90

1075

835

78

Mech. & Elec. Systems

23

19

83

995

695

70

Pre-Design

20

15

75

971

746

77

Site Planning

19

18

95

1215

857

71


NCIDQ EXAM - MARYLAND CANDIDATES - OCTOBER 2005

Listed below are the statistics for Maryland candidates who sat for the most recent National Council for Interior Designer Qualification exam with a comparison to the national pass rate.

EXAM SECTION

NUMBER
CANDIDATES

NUMBER

PASSED

PASS RATE
( MARYLAND )

PASS RATE
(NATIONAL)

SECTION 1

24

21

88%

61%

SECTION 2

26

22

85%

59%

SECTION 3

23

12

52%

64%


artistic page break

EXCEPTIONAL PROCTORS MAKE FOR EFFICIENT EXAM
ADMINISTRATION
By Janine S. McDonald


Four of the proctors stop to chat. >From left to right: John Miller, Kathleen Miller, Joyce Palmeri and Julius Mason

Meticulous.  Exhaustive.  Detailed.  These words describe the preparation 48 door and table proctors underwent for the engineering and land surveying licensing examinations held at the Timonium Fairgrounds April 20-22.  Exams offered included Fundamentals of Engineering, Principles and Practice of Engineering, and Fundamentals of Land Surveying as well as Maryland Law and Road Grade and Storm Drain Design for land surveyors.  To handle all the exam candidates, ready and willing proctors were on hand to receive exam candidates at the door as well as supervise the exams.

For example, Kathleen Miller and her husband, John Miller, were both first-time proctors for the April exams.  Kathleen, a substitute teacher, and John, a former police officer, took the part-time proctor position for extra income.  When asked about her feelings regarding being a first-time proctor, Kathleen explained, “I had the same anxiety as they [the exam candidates] did. I wanted them to be comfortable.”  Kathleen added that her experience as a substitute teacher prepared her for proctoring because the two jobs are so similar.

Four of the proctors stop to chat. From left to right: John Miller, Kathleen Miller, Joyce Palmeri and Julius Mason
On the other hand, retired senior Julius Mason, a proctor for the past four years, regards proctoring as something to keep him active.  He adds that he enjoys the job because he likes to see individuals—particularly youth—pursue their professional dreams.  “It’s very rewarding to see young people taking the exams and to see how diligent they are with moving on to their careers,” Mr. Mason says.  He comments that one thing he possibly dislikes about proctoring is the 12-hour day that proctors work. 

There are generally two types of proctors at the exam site, door proctors and table proctors.  Door proctors check items brought in by candidates, admissions letters and candidate photo IDs to verify the items comply with DLLR law.  Table proctors coordinate exam candidates’ seating, assign test booklets and observe candidates during tests.  Both are responsible for various tasks that involve the exam process from the time the applicants arrive at the door until they leave.

After coming to DLLR from now defunct exam company LGR Examination, Linda Rhew, examination coordinator, assumed the responsibility of hiring and coordinating the proctors.  A former proctor herself, Ms. Rhew was introduced to the profession after her next-door neighbor asked her to fill in at the last minute on a proctor assignment.  She consented and has been involved in proctoring and exam administration ever since.

Upon accepting her position with DLLR in August 2000, one of Ms. Rhew’s objectives was to improve overall exam administration.  “I wanted consistency and everyone to have the opportunity to take the exam under the same conditions,” says Ms. Rhew. She also created and wrote a proctor manual and checklist for use in training the proctors.  Her other job duties entail processing exam applications, reviewing college transcripts to determine that all educational requirements to sit for the exams have been met and interfacing with exam and licensure applicants.

Ms. Rhew adds that during her five plus years with the Design Boards it has been rewarding to witness the number of successful applicants completing and passing the exams.  She believes this is due to improvements in the test taking process.  “I don’t see the same people coming back because they’ve passed; and I hope it was because the site was more controlled.  I hope it had to do with the preparation of the exam site and the proctors,” says Ms. Rhew.

Other DLLR staff members recognize the importance of the proctors in administering the exams, as well.  Lee Woods, executive director for the Professional Design Boards, visited the Timonium Fairgrounds and witnessed the proctors in action firsthand.   “Proctors are an extremely vital part of the team enabling us to conduct the examination,” says Mr. Woods.  “They play a key role in helping us to assure the security of the exam, and the smooth on-site administration of it, by monitoring those persons taking it.  We’d be hard pressed to put on the examination without them.”

From the proctors to the exam coordinator to the executive director, it is agreed that proctors are doing a superb job in helping to ensure successful exam administration for the Maryland Design Boards.  Here’s looking at you, proctors!

BROCHURE CREATION UNDERWAY


As part of its public outreach program the Professional Design Boards are creating a series of brochures for distribution.  Janine McDonald, administrative officer/communications specialist, is responsible for writing and designing the brochures.

The first two brochures in the series, Maryland Design Boards Complaint Process and Understanding Maryland Professional Engineers' Licensure are being printed and prepared for distribution. The brochures are intended to help individuals understand the complaint process and licensing requirements as well as increase visibility for the various design professions.

The creation of the brochures has been instituted as part of the Design Boards' outreach program to consumers, licensees, the general public and building code officials. It is anticipated that each Design Board will have one brochure outlining its licensing requirements and another discussing the profession(s) it represents. The brochures could potentially be used for presentations to high school and college students as well as professional licensing applicants.

For more information about obtaining brochures for single copy or group distribution, please contact Janine McDonald at jmcdonald@dllr.state.md.us or (410) 230-6215.

artistic page break
BY DESIGN ARCHIVE OPERATIONAL

Have you ever wanted to look up an article from a past issue of By Design?  Well, now you can!  By Design has a new archive available on the DLLR Web site.  This feature enables readers to retrieve articles from back issues of the newsletter.  Click on the BYDESIGN NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE and scroll through the archive to find an article that interests you today.

Contacts
Click here for previous issues of By Design

artistic vertical line

Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation
Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing

op@dllr.state.md.us
500 North Calvert Street, 3rd Floor
Baltimore, Maryland, 21202

Joseph Sliwka, Commissioner
Harry Loleas, Deputy Commissioner

Thomas L. Woods, Executive Director
Pamela Edwards, Assistant Executive Director
410-230-6322
Fax 410-333-0021

By Design
Linda Sherman,
Publisher
Janine S. McDonald, Editor

Contributing Writers: Charles Maloy, Steve Parker, Skip Harclerode, Mike Howard, Pamela Edwards, Harry Loleas, Janine S. McDonald, Greg Safko, Linda Sherman, Milena Trust, Thomas L. Woods

YOUR BOARD MEMBERS

State Board of Architects
410-230-6261,
architect@dllr.state.md.us
Stephen L. Parker, Chair, Architect,
Montgomery County
Donald Ratcliffe, Architect, Baltimore County
Diane Cho, Architect, Baltimore City
Gary A. Bowden, Architect, Baltimore City
R. Glen Stephens, Architect, Howard County
Gary Ey, Consumer Member, Harford County
Juan Torrico, Consumer Member, Baltimore County

Terry White, Executive Secretary

State Board of Examiners of Landscape Architects
410-230-6256

landscape@dllr.state.md.us

Charles Bailey, Chair, Landscape Architect,
Howard County
Michael Fisher, Landscape Architect, Harford County
Liling T. Tien, Landscape Architect, Baltimore County
Evonne Caison, Consumer Member, Prince George's County
Ralph E. Reisler, Consumer Member, Cecil County

Mrs. Deborah Evans, Executive Secretary

State Board for Professional Land Surveyors
410-230-6256
surveyor@dllr.state.md.us

Charles Maloy Ed.D, Chair, Consumer Member, Baltimore County
Daniel P. Lavelle, Land Surveyor, Frederick County
Joan G. Dunne, Consumer Member, Baltimore County

John V. Mettee, III, Land Surveyor, Harford County
Thomas M. Orisich, Land Surveyor,
Baltimore County
Donald J. Ocker, Property Line Surveyor,
St. Mary's County

Mrs. Deborah Evans, Executive Secretary

State Board for Professional Engineers
410-230-6260
pe@dllr.state.md.us

Eugene C. Harvey, P.E., Chairman, Civil Engineer  Member, Anne Arundel County
Pastor Farinas, P.E., Electrical Engineer Member, Montgomery County
Sandra J. Murphy, Consumer Member, Prince George's County
Sallye E. Perrin, P.E., Civil Engineer Member, Baltimore City
H.C. Harclerode II, P.E., Chemical Engineer Member, Baltimore County
Alison Hunt, P.E., Mechanical Engineer Member, Baltimore City
Rosalind L. Yee, Consumer Member,
Anne Arundel County

Dorothy Matricciani, Executive Secretary

State Board for Certified Interior Designers
410-230-6259
interiordesign@dllr.state.md.us

Carol Doering, Chair, Certified Interior Designer
Teri Bennett, Certified Interior Designer, Baltimore
Carla K. Viar, Certified Interior Designer, Washington County
Diane Gordy, Certified Interior Designer, Montgomery County
Scott A. McGovern, Licensed Architect, Baltimore County

Ellen Schofield, Certified Interior Designer
Vacancy, Consumer Member
Janis Daniels, Executive Secretary