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Complaint Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - Stationary Engineers

  1. How do I file a complaint?
  2. How do I check a stationary engineer’s complaint history? How far back can I search for complaints?
  3. What information do I include with my complaint?
  4. Where do I send the complaint?
  5. What happens after I file a complaint?
  6. Does the stationary engineer receive a copy of the complaint?
  7. What happens if the stationary engineer does not respond to the complaint?
  8. What happens if the Stationary Engineer does respond to the complaint?
  9. Can I report a plant that does not have properly licensed stationary engineers?

1. How do I file a complaint?
The first step in the complaint process is to complete and sign a written complaint form. Complaint forms are available online. You may also call the board at 410-230-6231 to request that a complaint form be mailed to you.

2. How do I check a stationary engineer’s complaint history? How far back can I search for complaints?
Anyone may check a stationary engineer's complaint history by calling the Board of Stationary Engineers, Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., at the following telephone number: 410-230-6231.

3. What information do I include with my complaint?
In addition to the specific information requested in the complaint form, you should attach e-mails, receipts, or other correspondence between you and the stationary engineer. You may also include photographs or other evidence to support allegations in the complaint. Please make sure to fill out the complaint form completely and to sign it. You should also keep an original copy of all documents that you plan to send to the board.

4. Where do I send the complaint?
You may mail a complaint to Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation, Board of Stationary Engineers, 500 N. Calvert Street, Room 481, Baltimore, MD 21202.

5. What happens after I file a complaint?
After a complaint is received, board staff reviews the complaint to make sure that the board has jurisdiction over the complaint. board staff will assign a complaint number and open a complaint file for qualified complaints. The parties' contact information is entered in a database and the stationary engineer's license information and complaint history are added to the complaint file. After a week or two, a complainant can expect to receive a letter from the board confirming receipt of the complaint.

6. Does the stationary engineer receive a copy of the complaint?
After the complaint is reviewed by board staff, the individual who is the subject of the complaint is sent a copy of the complaint along with a Notice of Complaint/Order to Respond. The complaining party also receives a copy of the Notice of Complaint/Order to Respond. This document notifies the stationary engineer of the complaint and requests a written response to the complaint within 30 days. In addition to responding to the specific allegations contained in the complaint, the stationary engineer is required to provide a copy of documents to support the licensee’s claims.

7. What happens if the stationary engineer does not respond to the complaint?
If the stationary engineer does not respond to the Notice of Complaint, the board may, but is not obligated to, take action against a licensee for failure to respond. After a hearing on such a charge, the board may take disciplinary action against the stationary engineer, by the imposition of an administrative sanction, including reprimand, license suspension or revocation, or a civil monetary penalty of up to $5,000, if board finds that the stationary engineer violated the law by failing to respond in writing to the complaint.

8. What happens if the Stationary Engineer does respond to the complaint?
Once the stationary engineer responds in writing to the complaint, the board may assign the matter to an investigator. The purpose of the investigation is to determine whether there is enough evidence to support a charge that the stationary engineer violated any applicable statute or regulation.

9. Can I report a plant that does not have properly licensed stationary engineers?
Yes, you may report any concerns or hazardous work conditions to the board.