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DLLR's Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - Maryland Board of Stationary Engineers

 
  1. Board of Stationary Engineers
  2. Computerized Monitoring and Automatic Controls
  3. Filing a Complaint
  4. Heating Boilers
  5. Horsepower Determination
  6. License Categories
  7. License Requirements
  8. Penalties
  9. Portable or Leased Boilers
  10. Power Source
  11. Reciprocity with Other States
  12. Refrigeration Compressors
  13. Refrigeration Equipment
  14. Scope of the Law

1. Board of Stationary Engineers

What is the Board's mission and purpose?
The Board of Stationary Engineers administers a licensing program to ensure that qualified individuals provide stationary engineer services to protect the public; provide for the safe operation of power plants, plants of machinery and boilers; and to promote high professional standards (Section 6.5-102 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland).

Who monitors facilities to ensure compliance with stationary engineer's requirements?
Section 6.5-206(a) of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland) states that the Board may investigate any complaint that alleges a violation of this title.

When did Maryland implement the requirement for having stationary engineers employed to operate boilers and plants of machinery?
The current Statewide licensing requirements went into effect in 2005. Prior to that date, there was a Board of Examining Engineers.

Where can I find Maryland laws and regulations pertaining to stationary engineers?
The Maryland Stationary Engineers Act is found in the Business Occupations and Professions Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland. Regulations promulgated by the Board can be found in Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR), Title 09, Subtitle 17. The statutory and regulatory provisions governing the provision of stationary engineer services is are available online by visiting the Board's webpage and clicking on the "Laws" tab and then following the link to the Act.

2. Computerized Monitoring and Automatic Controls

What does the law mean when it refers to "24-hour computerized monitoring system and automatic controls"?
The Board's regulations applicable to computerized monitoring systems can be found in COMAR 09.17.02.01 through .09.

3. Filing a Complaint

How do I file a complaint with the Board?
An individual may file a complaint with the Board by completing and signing a complaint form. Please include as many details as possible. Copies of any documentation to support the allegations should be provided. You may mail the completed complaint form to: Maryland Board of Stationary Engineers, 500 North Calvert Street, Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21202.

4. Heating Boilers

Are heating boilers exempt from stationary engineer's requirements?
Exemptions to the license requirement are included in Section 6.5-301(b) of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland). A "heating boiler," as defined in Section 6.5-101(d) of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland), is specifically excluded from the definition of the term, "provide stationary engineer services," set forth in Section 6.5-101(f)(2) of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland). A "heating boiler" means (1) a steam boiler that operates at pressures not exceeding 15 psig; or (2) a hot water boiler that operates at pressures not exceeding 160 psig or temperatures not exceeding 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Accordingly, these units are not included in the licensing requirements pursuant to Section 6.5-101(f)(2) of the Act, which states that "provide stationary engineer service" does not include overseeing the operation of a heating boiler.

5. Horsepower Determination

Is the grade of license required based upon the sum of the horsepower ratings of all the equipment in the plant?
No. The grade of license required is based on the horsepower and operating pressure for the largest, single piece of equipment located in the plant, not the combined total, source of power, or any other information about the object(s).

6. License Categories

How do I determine the appropriate category of license for an individual assigned to oversee the machinery at my plant?
The appropriate license category is determined based on the horsepower and operating pressure for the largest, single piece of equipment located in the plant, not the combined total, power source, or any other information about the vessel(s).

Section 6.5-302 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland) sets forth the authority of each license grade:

Grade 1 Engineer: Engineer 500 or more horsepower (in any building)
Grade 2 Engineer: Engineer 300 to 499 horsepower (in any building)
Grade 3 Engineer: Engineer 100 to 299 horsepower (in any building)
Grade 4 Engineer: Engineer 30 to 99 horsepower (in any building regardless of use)
Grade 5 Engineer: Engineer 30 to 99 horsepower (in a building not open for public use)

7. License Requirements

Why do I need to have a stationary engineer to operate our boilers, we have been operating fine without a stationary engineer for years.
The Maryland Legislature established a statewide license for stationary engineers in order to protect the public, provide for the safe operation of power plants, plants of machinery and boilers; and to promote high professional standards. Section 6.5-102 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland). Section 6.5-401 of the Act also prohibits a person from performing, attempting to perform the functions of a stationary engineer the functions of a stationary engineer in the State unless licensed by the Board in the appropriate grade to provide such services. Section 6.5-404 of the Act states that a person who violates Section 6.5-401 of the Act is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to a fine not exceeding $1,000 or imprisonment not exceeding 6 months, or both, and on a second or subsequent conviction, a fine not exceeding $5,000 or imprisonment not exceeding 2 years or both. In addition, the Board may also impose an administrative sanction against any a person who violates an applicable section of the Title.

What counties in Maryland require stationary engineers and where is this information published?
Section 6.5-301 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland) states that an individual shall be licensed by the Board to provide stationary engineer services in the State. The license requirement is statewide and does not vary by county or local municipality.

Our plant requires a 1st grade stationary engineer; we have advertised for months to fill the position without success. Can we request a wavier for the 1st Grade stationary engineer's requirements and hire a 2nd grade stationary engineer?
The Board does not have the authority to waive the licensing requirement.

8. Penalties

What are the penalties for operating a boiler without having the appropriate license?
Section 6.5-404 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland) addresses penalties for violating the Act. Any person who violates Section 6.5-401, 6.5-402 or 6.5-403 of the Act is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to a fine not exceeding $1,000 or imprisonment not exceeding 6 months, or both, and on a second or subsequent conviction, a fine not exceeding $5,000 or imprisonment not exceeding 2 years or both. An individual who violates any other provision of the Act is subject to a penalty not exceeding $5,000.

Further, pursuant to Section 6.5-314 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland), the Board deny a license to an applicant or impose an administrative sanction on a licensee who violates a provision of the applicable laws or regulations, that includes a reprimand, license suspension or license revocation and a civil monetary penalty of up to $5,000 for each violation.

9. Portable or Leased Boilers

Our plant has two boilers out of service for repairs. We are currently leasing a 700 HP portable boiler to meet our steam requirements. Do we need a stationary engineer to operate a leased portable boiler?
Yes, a license is required to operate a leased or portable boiler if the boiler is otherwise required to be operated by a licensed individual. The owner or operator of portable or leased or stationary equipment shall comply with §6.5-302 where it is required that the object is inspected in accordance with the Maryland Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act and Regulations and that it have a valid Certificate of Inspection issued by the Commissioner of the Division of Labor and Industry; Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.

10. Power Source

Our plant generates power for the town using large diesel engines; are we required to have a stationary engineer license to operate our plant of machinery?
Yes. Diesel-powered engines are not specifically exempted in the law. Therefore, as set forth in Section 6.5-101 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland), oversight by an appropriately-licensed stationary engineer is required. Section 6.5-101(f) of the Act states that to "provide stationary engineer services" means to oversee the operation of a power plant, plant of machinery, or boiler, each generating pressure of more that 15 PSI and operating at 30 or more horsepower.

11. Reciprocity with Other States

I recently moved to Maryland from New Jersey. I hold a New Jersey stationary engineers license, will the State of Maryland honor my current license and issue me an equivalent Maryland stationary engineers license. If so how do I go about obtaining a reciprocal license?
At this time, Maryland and New Jersey do not hold a reciprocal agreement for a stationary engineers license examination waiver. Section 6.5-306.1 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act, (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland) grants the Board the authority to authorize examinations for certain grades based upon an individual's work experience.

Section 6.5-306.1(d) of the Act authorizes the Board to waive the examination requirements for a BRAC (the Base Realignment and Closure process as announced by the United States Department of Defense) applicant if the applicant files a request with the Board before July 1, 2012, pays the application fee, holds an active stationary engineer's license in good standing from Virginia or New Jersey (or from a locality of one of those states that is equivalent to the State license), has experience in the provision of stationary engineer services that meets the time requirements of Section 6.5-303 of the Act, and has relocated to the State as a family member of a BRAC employee.

12. Refrigeration Compressors

I have a universal refrigeration certificate and operate large centrifugal refrigeration compressors; do I need a stationary engineers license?
Yes, a stationary engineer license is needed to operate a large refrigeration compressor. As refrigeration equipment is not specifically exempted in the law, if a piece of refrigeration equipment falls within the definition of a "boiler," as set forth in Section 6.5-101 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland), oversight by an appropriately-licensed stationary engineer is required.

13. Refrigeration Equipment

Our plant of machinery has no boilers, only refrigeration equipment; do we require a stationary engineer's license?
Yes, the operator of the refrigeration equipment is required to hold a stationary engineer license. As refrigeration equipment is not specifically exempted in the law, as set forth in Section 6.5-101 of the Maryland Stationary Engineers Act (Business Occupations and Professions Article, Annotated Code of Maryland), oversight by an appropriately-licensed stationary engineer is required.

14. Scope of the Law

Does this law apply to equipment other than a boiler?
The Board has determined that the scope of the law includes all equipment actually or normally found in a facility which may be known as a power plant, or plant of machinery, or boiler room, or factory, or industrial or commercial enterprise, or educational or residential or health related facility, or place of private or public gathering.

The equipment may include a boiler, a pressure vessel, a furnace, a heater, a heat exchanger, an autoclave or sterilizer or cooker, a motor, an engine, a generator, a fan, a pump, a compressor, a separator, a precipitator, a refrigerator, a chiller, an air handler, a filter, a water treatment system, a fire suppression system, a press, a roller, a mill, a welder, a hydraulic system, a cylinder, an extruder, or any other equipment or system which may create a hazard to life, limb, or property if not operated or maintained in accordance with codes, standards, manufacturer's recommendations, or good engineering practice.